Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? The more subtle implication is that since both men have claimed him as their friend, they have equal authority to speak on the subject of Caesar's disposition. He hath brought many captives home to Rome : Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill: Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? This money that was paid to Rome did not go into the treasure chest or coffers of the General Caesar, but was used for the people of Rome. coronets: a small crown, for nobles. Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept. The use of logic, reason, and facts to support a claim (it shows the audience, "What's in it for me?") He was my friend, faithful and just to me: But Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honourable man. Of course not. You all did see that on the Lupercal. also, did he give the slaves to others? When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept: Ambition should be made of sterner stuff: Yet Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honourable man. Antony reminds them that if they had cause to love him—and as he's refuted the rationale behind Caesar's assassination—then they have every reason to lament his death. / - - / - / - / - / He hath brought many captives home to Rome The pronoun, given the preceding reference to Brutus, can sometimes be a tad confusing at first; the "He" refers to Caesar. I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke. Yet Brutus says he was ambitious, And Brutus is … He hath brought many captives home to Rome You can scan the "O" as unstressed, but because the beginning of the line is an interjection—and a somewhat melodramatic one at that—it reads better with the marked stress. He also says Caesar has left everything he owns for the people. In a scarcely audible voice Buckingham said " The villain hath killed me! But he gradually shifts his tone and meaning to praise Caesar. Antony, however, has the advantage of not needing to justify his actions. "), but conspicuously rearranges it; where Brutus begins with "Romans" to reflect his appeal to their reason, Antony begins with "friends," which reflects the more emotional tact he will take throughout the rest of his speech. You all did see that on the Lupercal I thrice presented him a kingly crown, You all did see that on the Lupercal I thrice presented him a kingly crown, He hath brought many captives home to Rome Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill: Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest— For Brutus is an honourable man; So are they all, all honourable men— Come I to speak in Caesar's funeral. Keep in mind that Rome was a centuries-old republic founded upon the overthrow of its original monarchy. He hath brought many captives home to Rome, whose ransoms did the general coffers fill. This is Antony's best evidence to contradict the speech of Brutus, and Antony knows that the majority of his audience will see it as he portrays it. My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar, 0. It's tempting to think that Shakespeare meant general (meaning "public" in this context) to be pronounced more like gen'ral to adhere more strictly to iambic meter. full speech, 0:55 for exact line 4 comments 72% Upvoted Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill: Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? The hardest word to scan is lives; if you scan it as stressed, you have four consecutive stresses in a row, and the line scans iamb/pyrrhic/spondee/spondee/iamb. He hath brought many captives home to Rome Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill: Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? He hath brought many captives home to Rome, Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill. He hath brought many captives home to Rome Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill: Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? To portray Caesar as sympathetically weeping for their plight is fanning the flames, although Antony is saving his proof (Caesar's will) as a trump card for later. 0. ... Antony: "He hath brought many captives home to Rome / Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill. The marked pronunciation of interréd (Middle English enteren, via French enterrer, which derives from Medieval Latin interrare meaning "within earth") is another trick to keep the meter strict in this line; otherwise, he would have written it as interr'd. But, Brutus says he was ambitious; and Brutus is an honorable man. Ambition should me made of sterner stuff, yet Brutus says, he was ambitious and … Antony's emoting is setting up for a dramatic pause to give both himself and the crowd a brief respite. The second foot of the line is the only tricky one to scan. He hath brought many captives home to Rome, Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill: Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? Come I to speak in Caesar's funeral. And grievously hath Caesar answer'd it. In doing so, Antony effectively obeys the letter of his agreement without yielding to its spirit. Methinks there is much reason in his sayings. He hath brought many captives home to Rome Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill; Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? /--/ - /-/-/ He hath brought many captives home to Rome The pronoun, given the preceding reference to Brutus, can sometimes be a tad confusing at first; the "He" refers to Caesar. The regularity of the meter and the nine syllables leads one to believe Shakespeare's intent was that ambitious be pronounced am-BI-shee-US rather eliding the end to SHUS as we do now. Ask Login That might lead one to believe that there was indeed some ambition in Caesar—and perhaps some reason for concern. 90 : When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept: Ambition should be made of sterner stuff: Yet Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honourable man. Although the traditional reading of grievously in context is "painfully or heavily," it's an interesting play upon meaning to read Antony's meaning as akin to "it was a criminal fault that was criminally dealt with." The good is oft interred with their bones; When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept: He hath brought many captives home to Rome. Stern denotes "pitiless; cruel or unkind." He hath brought many captives home to Rome Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill: Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? And grievously hath Caesar answer'd it. But Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honourable man. He hath brought many captives home to Rome, Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill. When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept: Ears ; I come to bury Caesar, and I must pause till it come to! 3, scene 2 in Julius Caesar is one of Shakespeare 's way of subtly reinforcing shift... 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